Gratuity

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Gratuity is a lump sum payment given by the employer on resignation or retirement or death. It is a mark of recognition to the employee's service.

In India, as per the Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972, it is mandatory for all companies with employee strength of 10 or more employees to pay Gratuity. The provisions of the Act state that every employee who has completed 5 years of service with an organization is eligible to get the gratuity as per the pre-defined formula as given in the Act. The benefit is non-taxable up-to a ceiling of INR 10 lakhs.

Accounting standard classifies this benefit as a Post Employment Benefit and requires an Actuary to value these benefits for measurement, recognition and disclosures in the Financial Statements

Leave valuation

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During the course of an employment, an employee accrues leave. These leaves are to be exercised in accordance with the prevalent rules and company policy. There are different kinds of leave generally granted by the companies. Some examples are Casual leave, Earned/Privilege leave, Maternity leave, Sick leave and others.

If the leaves can be carried forward to the future years either for the purposes of utilization or for encashment, then the accounting standard categorizes such leaves as "Other Long term benefits". An entity is required to make provision in the books of accounts from a Actuary in respect of these benefits to comply with accounting standards and good corporate governance practices.

Pension valuation

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Most of the government organizations provide pensions to their employees are retirement. Since pension benefits are not mandatory for private companies, only few employers in private sector provide pension to their employees.

Pension is typically given to employees to ensure a stable livelihood post retirement. An actuary is required to value the pension liability for the company based on the pension rules. The measurement, recognition and disclosures in the Financial Statements will be on similar lines to Gratuity/ End of Service Benefit.

Provident Fund valuations

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Provident Fund is a defined contribution scheme where the employer and employee contribute a fixed sum to Employees Provident Fund Organization.

If the provident funds have an exempt status, then the responsibility of provision of benefits rests in the hands of the employer. Employer needs to ensure that fund earns at least equivalent to EPFO rate or better.

An Actuary is required to certify the sufficiency of the funds and provision be made in the books of the employer for any shortfall in the funds.

ESOPs & Retention Bonus Schemes

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In India, many companies have given ESOPs to their employees. ESOPs help ensure alignment of goals of the management and shareholders. We help companies design ESOP and other loyalty bonus schemes and value them for accounting and other purposes.

Design, Re-Design & Drafting of Employee Benefit Schemes

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Employee benefits schemes should be stitched with a lot of care and diligence as they help defining employer-employee relations and have regulatory implications.

Owing to our core expertise in this domain, we provide clients with a 360 degree view of all stakeholders of scheme advantages and disadvantages and budget their current and future costs.

Other related services

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Pricing & Product development

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Reserving & Statutory valuations

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Bonus estimation for 'participating' portfolio

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Experience Analysis

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Investments

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Others

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Pricing & Product development

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Reserving & Statutory valuations

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Experience Analysis

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Investments

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Others

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Services

We provide the following range of services to our clients :

Employee Benefits

We value all types of employee benefit liabilities which are statutory or voluntary in nature as per all accounting standards.

The firm carries more than 30 years of experience in Actuarial valuation, Scheme design and Funding of Employee Benefit liabilities. Some key employee benefits specific to India

Risk Management

All businesses have their own set of risks. They can be broadly divided into two categories viz. financial and non-financial risks. Financial Risks include Market Risk, Business Risk, Credit Risk, and Liquidity Risk while non-financial risks include operational risk and external risk.

No doubt any business entity needs a robust risk management framework but the small and medium enterprises (SMEs) need much more than that as they may not have financial resources and professional ability to manage and control risks due to their very size and several limitations. As a result of their size and access to capital, small businesses face more acute challenges than ordinary businesses.